Marital satisfaction is linked to women’s sexual desire, suggests a new study, which found that women’s levels of sexual desire were not only lower than men’s at the beginning of their marriages, but much more variable than men’s. Men’s levels of sexual desire stayed higher and more constant.
comments | science | 18 hrs ago
Perth scientists crack the code to crops resilient to climate change. By identifying the genes linked to shatter tolerance, disease, and productivity, scientists can work with breeders to build crops resilient to drought, gusty winds and storms.
comments | science | 18 hrs ago
A new "blackest" material has been discovered, absorbing 99.996% of light that falls on it (over 10 times blacker than Vantablack or anything else ever reported)
comments | science | 23 hrs ago
Using "time outs" to discipline children is not going to harm them or your relationship with them, suggests new study of almost 1,400 families. Children's anxiety or aggressive behaviour did not increase. In contrast, when parents said they used physical punishment, children became more aggressive.
comments | science | 14th Sep '19
Drinking more coffee may reduce risk of developing gallstones, suggests new study in Journal of Internal Medicine (n=104,493). Those who drank more than 6 cups of coffee per day had 23% lower risk of developing symptomatic gallstones, with 1 extra cup of coffee per day linked with 3% lower risk.
comments | science | 14th Sep '19
Physicists have 'heard' the ringing of an infant black hole for the first time, and found that the pattern of this ringing does, in fact, predict the black hole's mass and spin -- more evidence that Einstein was right all along.
comments | science | 14th Sep '19
It’s not just bees that are being harmed by the pesticides called neonicotinoids, it’s birds too. A study in Canada has shown that migrating white-crowned sparrows lose weight just hours after eating seeds treated with the neocotinoid imidacloprid, delaying their onward migration by several days.
comments | science | 13th Sep '19
When false claims are repeated, we start to believe they are true, suggests a new study. This phenomenon, known as the “illusory truth effect”, is exploited by politicians and advertisers. Using our own knowledge to fact-check can prevent us from believing it is true when it is later repeated.
comments | science | 13th Sep '19
7 positive childhood experiences (PCEs) linked to better adult mental health, finds study (n=6,188): Family talks about feelings; Family by me during difficulties; Traditions; Sense of belonging in high school; Supportive friends; Non-parent adults genuine interest; Safe/ protected by adult in home.
comments | science | 12th Sep '19
Results from a large (n=48188), 18-year follow-up from the prospective EPIC-Oxford study show that vegetarians and vegans have a 20% higher risk of stroke compared to meat eaters.
comments | science | 12th Sep '19
Water found in a habitable super-Earth's atmosphere for the first time. Thanks to having water, a solid surface, and Earth-like temperatures, "this planet [is] the best candidate for habitability that we know right now," said lead author Angelos Tsiaras.
comments | science | 11th Sep '19
Fame-seeking mass shooters tend to receive more media attention, suggests a new study. About 96% of fame-seeking mass shooters received at least one mention in the New York Times, compared to 74% of their counterparts. The media may be reinforcing their motivations, and contributing to copycats.
comments | science | 11th Sep '19
Scientists have shown that physical fitness is associated with better brain structure and brain functioning in young adults. Increasing fitness levels may lead to improved cognitive ability, such as memory and problem solving, as well as improved structural changes in the brain.
comments | science | 11th Sep '19
Cancer patients turning to crowdfunding to help pay medical costs, reports a new JAMA Internal Medicine study, which finds the financial costs are so high that many are resorting to crowdfunding to help pay their medical bills and related costs. The median fundraising goal was $10,000.
comments | science | 11th Sep '19
A research team has deciphered the genome of the Chardonnay grape. By doing so, they have uncovered something fascinating: grapes inherit different numbers of genes from their mothers and fathers.
comments | science | 11th Sep '19
Majority of Americans, including gun and non-gun owners, across political parties, support a variety of gun policies, suggests a new study (n=1,680), which found high levels of support for most measures, including purchaser licensing (77%) and universal background checks of handgun purchasers (88%).
comments | science | 10th Sep '19
A newly synthesized chemical could pave the way for the manufacture of calcium-based batteries, which might be safer and cheaper than today’s lithium-based models.
comments | science | 9th Sep '19
Most doctors think Obamacare has helped patients get better healthcare, even as a lengthy court battle threatens to strike down the law, finds a new study. About 60% of physicians in the US thought the Affordable Care Act gave more people access to medical treatment they wouldn't otherwise have had.
comments | science | 9th Sep '19
Around 1.4 billion fewer cigarettes are being smoked every year according to new research (n=136,677) in England. This decline suggests that stricter tobacco laws and taking action to encourage people to quit smoking are working. “The government committed to making the UK smokefree by 2030.”
comments | science | 8th Sep '19
Doctors have identified previously unrecognized characteristic of the vaping-related respiratory illness that has been emerging in clusters across the U.S. in recent months. Within the lungs of these patients are large immune cells containing numerous oily droplets, called lipid-laden macrophages.
comments | science | 8th Sep '19
Taxing Sweetened Drinks by the Amount of Sugar Could Cut Obesity & Boost Economic Gains. Such a tax would also result in economic gains -- primarily through savings in health care costs -- of about $1.4 billion per year nationwide.
comments | science | 8th Sep '19
Politically incorrect speech works in politics because it can help people appear more authentic, suggests a new study (n=4,956), which found that replacing even a single word with a politically incorrect one makes people view a speaker as more authentic and less likely to be swayed by others.
comments | science | 7th Sep '19